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Children's Immunisation Schedule

These are the routine vaccinations that are offered free of charge on the NHS to all babies and children in the UK.

5-in-1 vaccine

Protects against: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, polio and Hib (haemophilus influenza type B)

Given at: two, three and four months of age.

Men B vaccine

The Men B vaccine protects your baby against meningococcal group B bacteria.

Given at: 2 months of age, followed by a second dose at 4 months, and a booster at 12 months.

Pneumococcal or pneumo jab (PCV)

Protects against: some types of pneumococcal infection

Given at: two, four and 12-13 months of age.

Rotavirus vaccine 

Protects against: rotavirus infection, a common cause of childhood diarrhoea and sickness

Given at: two and three months of age

Meningitis C (Men C)

Protects against: meningitis C (meningococcal type C)

Given at: three months of age and as a teenage booster at age 13-15 

Hib/Men C (booster)

Protects against: haemophilus influenza type b (Hib) and meningitis C

Given at: 12-13 months of age

MMR

Protects against: measles, mumps and rubella

Given at: 12-13 months and at 3 years and 4 months of age, or sometime thereafter.

Men B vaccine

Second dose (from September 1st 2015) Given at: 4 months of age.

Men B vaccine

Third dose (from September 1st 2015) Given at: 12-13 months of age.

4-in-1 pre-school booster

Protects against: diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough and polio

Given at: 3 years and 4 months of age, or shortly thereafter


Adult Vaccinations

Men ACWY vaccine

Given at: 19-25 years of age (first time students only).

HPA Childrens Vaccination Schedule

Click here for the recommended HPA vaccination schedule

Pneumococcal Vaccination 

This is a single injection that can help protect you from pneumococcal pneumonia, which is one of the commonest causes of death due to infection in both men and women. Pneumonia can also have dramatic long-term effects on your life, preventing you from carrying out simple daily activities.

Further information at:  www.NoOneExpects.co.uk

If you are 65 and above and have not had this important vaccination, please book an appointment with the Practice Nurse.

Shingles Vaccination

The national shingles immunisation programme is recommended for people aged 70 to 79, but  is being introduced in phases.  Vaccine groups are defined by age on 1st September.

There is a handy calculator available by following this link: Am I Eligible?, if you enter your date of birth, it will tell you if you are eligible for the vaccination.  If you are and would like to book an appointment or are having problems using this link, please speak to one of our receptionists.


Seasonal Flu Vaccination

Influenza – flu – is a highly infectious and potentially serious illness caused by influenza viruses. Each year the make-up of the seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against the influenza viruses that the World Healflujabsth Organization decide are most likely to be circulating in the coming winter.

Regular immunisation (vaccination) is given free of charge to the following at-risk people, to protect them from seasonal flu:

  • people aged 65 or over,
  • people with a serious medical condition
  • people living in a residential or nursing home
  • the main carers for an elderly, vulnerable or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer becomes ill
  • those who work in close contact with poultry, such as chickens.

Travel Vaccinations

If you require any vaccinations relating to foreign travel you need to make an appointment with the practice nurse to discuss your travel arrangements.  This will be a telephone call with the nurse and include which countries and areas within countries that you are visiting to determine what vaccinations are required. 

There is further information about countries and vaccinations required on the links below

Europe Europe & RussiaNorth America North America
Central America Central AmericaSouth America South America
Caribbean CaribbeanAfrica Africa
Middle East Middle EastCentral Asia Central Asia
East Asia East AsiaAustralasia  Australasia and Pacific

 

It is important to make this initial telephone appointment as early as possible  - at least 6 weeks before you travel - as a second appointment will be required with the practice nurse to actually receive the vaccinations.  These vaccines have to be ordered as they are not a stock vaccine.  Your second appointment needs to be at least 2 weeks before you travel to allow the vaccines to work.

Some travel vaccines are ordered on a private prescription and these incur a charge over and above the normal prescription charge.  This is because not all travel vaccinations are included in the services provided by the NHS.  Please see the 'Non-NHS Charges' section for details of our fees.

There is currently a national shortage of yellow fever, Hepatitis B and Typhoid vaccines and the manufacturers prefer to supply private travel clinics rather than GP Surgeries. Therefore we may not be able to fulfill your vaccine requirements before you travel and in the case of yellow fever vaccination and certification this may result in you not being able to travel to your chosen destination.  

Travel Health Questionnaire

To help us offer the appropriate advice, please fill out the online form before coming to see the nurse.  Please allow at least 5 working days if you use this facility.

clock2Travel Questionnaire

Travelling in Europe

If you are travelling to Europe a very useful booklet has been published with advice and guidance to help you get the most out of your holiday.  To visit please click:- http://ec.europa.eu/publications/booklets/eu_glance/86/en.pdf (this is a large document and may take a minute or two to view)

 
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